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Guest Eat Shadows
48 minutes ago, psycho said:

Vlad=short version of Vladislav

Vova, Volodya or Vovochka=short versions of Vladimir

 

hth you absolute fucking idiot

Didn't know that.

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FINALLY a major scientific test is undertaken :parrot:

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As a social scientist, Kangas hopes to have as big a sample as possible. With 100,000 people participating, he says it would be possible to see trends at a local and regional level, and to understand the impact among certain groups, like the long-term unemployed. The government has mentioned a figure of 800 euros. But the final amount could be more or less than that, and some income could be conditional. KELA might give 400 euros automatically, then base the rest on participation—for example, if people volunteer with charities.

 

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A very good op-ed from the NYT about how Saddam actually laid the groundwork for ISIS in a lot of ways.

 

It's true that the US invasion expedited the rise of ISIS in the way we handled our invasion but Saddam's regime actually laid the groundwork for the underground networks that would later be used by ISIS to smuggle stuff in and out of the country to bypass western sanctions. 

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Guest Eat Shadows
4 hours ago, Roger Sterling said:

Bring back saddam imo

Yeah. I hate to say it, but after reviewing all of the plausible solutions to the Syrian Civil War I am fully behind supporting Assad to take back the country. 

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I've read about Zucker before and that article is extremely generous to him. From most accounts I've read, he's an asshole and fully supports the outdated reparative model. It's also not completely his fault but he's a hero to bigots of the world who think conversion therapy is a winner.

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http://www.alternet.org/media/idiocracy-has-one-cruelest-and-anti-social-plotlines-youll-find-hollywood-movie-why-do

 

 

 

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The idea that a corrosive intellectual and political climate (for which Trump is the current avatar) can be chalked up to too many dumb people having kids or some vague, guiltless notion of "dumbing down", rather than deliberate policy directives of the wealthy and their far-right media machinery - to say nothing of the inability of the left to adequately combat this machinery - is one of the more reductionist and politically useless ideas to populate our discourse. We are not living in an idiocracy, we are living in an oligarchy, for which political stupidity is one of many symptom caused by the large, malignant cancer of inequality and runaway capitalism.

 

 

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Guest Eat Shadows

http://theconversation.com/academics-can-change-the-world-if-they-stop-talking-only-to-their-peers-55713

 

Spoiler

Research and creative thinking can change the world. This means that academics have enormous power. But, as academics Asit Biswas and Julian Kirchherr have warned, the overwhelming majority are not shaping today’s public debates.

Instead, their work is largely sitting in academic journals that are read almost exclusively by their peers. Biswas and Kirchherr estimate that an average journal article is “read completely by no more than ten people”. They write:

Up to 1.5 million peer-reviewed articles are published annually. However, many are ignored even within scientific communities – 82% of articles published in humanities [journals] are not even cited once.

This suggests that a lot of great thinking and many potentially world altering ideas are not getting into the public domain. Why, then, are academics not doing more to share their work with the broader public?

The answer appears to be threefold: a narrow idea of what academics should or shouldn’t do; a lack of incentives from universities or governments; and a lack of training in the art of explaining complex concepts to a lay audience.

The ‘intellectual mission’

Some academics insist that it’s not their job to write for the general public. They suggest that doing so would mean they’re “abandoning their mission as intellectuals”. They don’t want to feel like they’re “dumbing down” complex thinking and arguments.

The counter argument is that academics can’t operate in isolation from the world’s very real problems.

They may be producing important ideas and innovations that could help people understand and perhaps even begin to address issues like climate change, conflict, food insecurity and disease.

No incentives

Universities also don’t do a great deal to encourage academics to step beyond lecture halls and laboratories. There are globally very few institutions that offer incentives to their academics to write in the popular media, appear on TV or radio, or share their research findings and opinions with the public via these platforms.

In South Africa, where I conduct research and teach, incentives are limited to more “formal” publication methods. Individual institutions and the Department of Higher Education and Training offer rewards for publishing books, book chapters, monographs or articles in accredited, peer-reviewed journals.

The department pays universities more than R100,000 per full publication unit – for example, one journal article. These funds are given to universities, which then use their own subsidy disbursement schemes to split the funds between the institution, the faculty in which the author works and the author. In some cases, academics receive more funding for articles published in international journals than in local journals.

Catriona Macleod of Rhodes University in South Africa has argued that these financial incentives are an example of the “commodification of research” and that this is “bad for scholarship”. Macleod told University World News:

The incentive system is a blunt instrument that serves the purposes of increasing university income rather than supporting scholarship and knowledge production in South Africa.

There is nothing in the department’s policy that urges academics to share their research beyond academic spaces. There’s no suggestion that public outreach or engagement is valued. And this situation is not unique to South Africa: the “publish or perish” culture is a reality at universities all over the world.

Academics have no choice but to go along with this system. Their careers and promotions depend almost entirely on their journal publication record, so why even consider engaging with the general public?

Learning to write

There is a third factor holding academics back from writing for broader lay audiences: even if they’d like to, they may not know where to start and how to do it.

Writing an article for an academic journal is a very different process to penning one for those outside the academy. Naomi Wolf and Sacha Kopp, in an article examining the issue, wrote:

Academic writing has the benefit of scholarly rigour, full documentation and original thinking. But the transmission of our ideas is routinely hampered … by a great deal of peer-oriented jargon.

Universities have a role to play here by offering workshops and courses to their academics and students. This can help develop creative non-fiction writing skills.

Time for a change

Academics need to start playing a more prominent role in society instead of largely remaining observers who write about the world from within ivory towers and publish their findings in journals hidden behind expensive digital paywalls.

Government and university policies need to become more prescriptive in what they expect from academics. Publishing research in peer-reviewed journals is and will remain highly important. But incentives should be added to encourage academics to share their research with the general public.

Doing this sort of work ought to count towards promotions and should yield rewards for both universities and individual academics.

Quality academic research and innovation are crucial. It is equally important, though, to get ideas out into the world beyond academia. It could make a real difference in people’s lives.

 

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It's seriously a good read.  It dives into the magazine's politics quite succinctly.

 

But while Frase cites Marx and Luxemburg, and includes the odd piece of Marxist terminology for the superfans, he also cites the New York Times's Farhad Manjoo, mainstream MIT economists Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, Ender's Game, and the Justin Timberlake movie In Time. This is not the prose of a Marxist academic writing:

Suppose, for example, that all production is by means of Star Trek’s replicator. In order to make money from selling replicated items, people must somehow be prevented from just making whatever they want for free, and this is the function of intellectual property. A replicator is only available from a company that licenses you the right to use one, since anyone who tried to give you a replicator or make one with their own replicator would be violating the terms of their license. What’s more, every time you make something with the replicator, you must pay a licensing fee to whoever owns the rights to that particular thing. In this world, if Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard wanted to replicate his beloved "tea, Earl Grey, hot", he would have to pay the company that has copyrighted the replicator pattern for hot Earl Grey tea.

Because of the clarity of language, you can begin to imagine what the futures Frase details actually look like. You can see what a future of abundance but inequality looks like: It's a world where replicator-produced Earl Grey is copyrighted.

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Guest Eat Shadows

Article in which a Nixon policy adviser admits he invented the "War on Drugs" to suppress the antiwar left and black people:

https://harpers.org/archive/2016/04/legalize-it-all/

 

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At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away. “You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

 

I must have looked shocked. Ehrlichman just shrugged. Then he looked at his watch, handed me a signed copy of his steamy spy novel,The Company, and led me to the door.

 

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But much of this Western media coverage mimics the propaganda coming from Brazil’s homogenized, oligarch-owned, anti-democracy media outlets and, as such, is misleading, inaccurate, and incomplete, particularly when coming from those with little familiarity with the country (there are numerous Brazil-based Western reporters doing outstanding work).

 

https://theintercept.com/2016/03/18/brazil-is-engulfed-by-ruling-class-corruption-and-a-dangerous-subversion-of-democracy/

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anyone still remotely interested in the Elisa Lam story?

 

https://medium.com/matter/haunted-947d642a6d59#.ngikeivkt

 

someone shared this thoughtful empathetic piece with me earlier today and i felt oddly encouraged towards the end.

 

it is a long read but 100% worth the investment.

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How Economists Rode Maths to Become Our Era's Astrologers

 

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The failure of the field to predict the 2008 crisis has also been well-documented. In 2003, for example, only five years before the Great Recession, the Nobel Laureate Robert E Lucas Jr told the American Economic Association that ‘macroeconomics […] has succeeded: its central problem of depression prevention has been solved’. Short-term predictions fair little better – in April 2014, for instance, a survey of 67 economists yielded 100 per cent consensus: interest rates would rise over the next six months. Instead, they fell. A lot.

Nonetheless, surveys indicate that economists see their discipline as ‘the most scientific of the social sciences’. What is the basis of this collective faith, shared by universities, presidents and billionaires? Shouldn’t successful and powerful people be the first to spot the exaggerated worth of a discipline, and the least likely to pay for it?

In the hypothetical worlds of rational markets, where much of economic theory is set, perhaps. But real-world history tells a different story, of mathematical models masquerading as science and a public eager to buy them, mistaking elegant equations for empirical accuracy.

 

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The trouble with Kelvin’s statement is that measurement and mathematics do not guarantee the status of science – they guarantee only the semblance of science. When the presumptions or conclusions of a scientific theory are absurd or simply false, the theory ought to be questioned and, eventually, rejected. The discipline of economics, however, is presently so blinkered by the talismanic authority of mathematics that theories go overvalued and unchecked.

 

 

And here's a comment from the internet that does a nice job of putting a little ribbon on all this...the final thing that the article never comes out and says:

 

 

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Prophetic quackery achieves popularity by deliberately making vague and ambiguous predictions; the oracle at Delphi, the Book of Revelations, the quatrains of Nostradamus were (and are!) widely cited because they can be read to match many disparate events. Astrological and economic predictions share this property, but economics has become more than a toolkit for soothsayers, it is now a means of justifying the established order.

 

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one day the poor will rise up

 

the mashes against the clashes

 

(the clash versus boys against girls GvsB / GBV too!)

 

 

but without sinister leaders CONTROLLING "us"

 

everyone will just end up killing each other!

 

Butter Chaos!

 

and only then will we realize we had it so much better before!

 

 

ga ga ga GIVE ME THE GORE (not the poor!)

 

kill the poor!

 

kill the pope!

 

THE POPE SMOKES DOPE

 

does ze pope shit in the woods?

::2

 

he smokes shit weed

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