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psycho

Nutrition and Exercise

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holy fuck, that's a lot! I felt good about doing 40 km, which is only 24 miles. Go metric system! It makes things seem more impressive. 

 

What I like about running and cycling (solo, not in a group) is that you're only competing against yourself and the best you can do is good enough.  It's nice.

harcourt likes this

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also speaking of nutrition, there's a great app called the Daily Dozen.  It's a checklist of food to eat for people who have a meatless diet, though it also works for omnivores too (like me). For instance, you're supposed to eat three servings of beans, one cruciferous, two greens, two veg, three fruit, one flax, exercise, etc. There are 24 checks overall. I've been using it since the spring and have been eating a lot better. It's great.  It was created by the guy that wrote How Not To Die, which is a great nutrition book that encourages a meatless diet and is not at all based on junk science like so many nutrition books are.

 

 

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When I did a lot of cycling, I remember having a couple 100 mile days under my belt and when I was in Canada cycling across BC w/ a group of Brits, they would be so impressed w/ 100 km days. 

 

Felt so cheated, tbh. 

 

Best two days of cycling ever: Lake Louise to Jasper. :wub: 

 

Second best: Jasper to Lake Louise. 

Kemper Boyd likes this

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13 hours ago, harcourt said:

When I did a lot of cycling, I remember having a couple 100 mile days under my belt and when I was in Canada cycling across BC w/ a group of Brits, they would be so impressed w/ 100 km days. 

 

Felt so cheated, tbh.

 

Best two days of cycling ever: Lake Louise to Jasper. :wub: 

 

Second best: Jasper to Lake Louise. 

 

100 km, great day! 62 miles, not so much! That sounds like an amazing ride, I am jealous. I've been out there but not on a bike.

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i got reminded of all those garbage food posts psycho used to show us when i saw my aunt post a chicken-crust pizza video/recipe... it didn't actually look terrible but i can't even fucking imagine what it would taste like 

psycho likes this

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On 10/25/2017 at 11:11 AM, >:{ said:

I wanna start using the rowing machine but I feel like I'm DEFINITELY gonna do it wrong and fuck up my back

I just started playing around on the rowing machine and I love it. There are a ton of good videos about technique, if you can get past how all the dudes in them seem like rich Ivy League assholes.

 

No idea what makes it less awful and unbearable than the treadmill or cycling or whatever, but it is good and enjoyable.

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https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/09/why-it-was-easier-to-be-skinny-in-the-1980s/407974/

the titles of these things are always terrible misleading clickbait, and the first few paragraphs are about a meme but here is the meat of it

 

A study published recently in the journal Obesity Research & Clinical Practicefound that it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise.

 

The authors examined the dietary data of 36,400 Americans between 1971 and 2008 and the physical activity data of 14,419 people between 1988 and 2006. They grouped the data sets together by the amount of food and activity, age, and BMI.

They found a very surprising correlation: A given person, in 2006, eating the same amount of calories, taking in the same quantities of macronutrients like protein and fat, and exercising the same amount as a person of the same age did in 1988 would have a BMI that was about 2.3 points higher. In other words, people today are about 10 percent heavier than people were in the 1980s, even if they follow the exact same diet and exercise plans.

“If you are 25, you’d have to eat even less and exercise more than those older, to prevent gaining weight.”

“Our study results suggest that if you are 25, you’d have to eat even less and exercise more than those older, to prevent gaining weight,” Jennifer Kuk, a professor of kinesiology and health science at Toronto’s York University, said in a statement. “However, it also indicates there may be other specific changes contributing to the rise in obesity beyond just diet and exercise.”

Just what those other changes might be, though, are still a matter of hypothesis. In an interview, Kuk proffered three different factors that might be making harder for adults today to stay thin.

First, people are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.

Second, the use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.

 

Finally, Kuk and the other study authors think that the microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity. Americans are eating more meat than they were a few decades ago, and many animal products are treated with hormones and antibiotics in order to promote growth. All that meat might be changing gut bacteria in ways that are subtle, at first, but add up over time. Kuk believes the proliferation of artificial sweeteners could also be playing a role.

The fact that the body weights of Americans today are influenced by factors beyond their control is a sign, Kuk says, that society should be kinder to people of all body types.

“There's a huge weight bias against people with obesity,” she said. “They're judged as lazy and self-indulgent. That's really not the case. If our research is correct, you need to eat even less and exercise even more” just to be same weight as your parents were at your age.

 

dunderhead, pentachris and psycho like this

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