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What Books Have You Bought?

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I prefer the old Kindle because I absolutely hate unnecessary physical items around me. 'Ooh look at me lining my room with things I'll almost certainly never read again.' Pointless. It's like buying DVDs. No point. (About 20% of the books I buy are physical, but I'll usually sell them when I'm done. You can torrent most books these days too, God bless x)

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2 minutes ago, Lights said:

The Paperwhite is brilliant and like Plop says, is completely different from reading off a tablet or anything like that.

 

If it's a book I really want I still buy the hardback though :)

 

Just had a look, bit dear, it's 2017 why are they over 100 quid still?! 

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On 10/8/2017 at 2:40 PM, Minori said:

I prefer the old Kindle because I absolutely hate unnecessary physical items around me. 'Ooh look at me lining my room with things I'll almost certainly never read again.' Pointless. It's like buying DVDs. No point. (About 20% of the books I buy are physical, but I'll usually sell them when I'm done. You can torrent most books these days too, God bless x)

I used to think this, but through experience and studies about e-reading (such as this and this), I've become won over more to the "physical books" camp.  (I do not hold the same convictions about "physical" music and movies)  The short of it is that, at least on present evidence, people tend to gloss more and retain less of what they read on a screen.  The reasons for this are not yet fully understood, but at any rate, if I want to retain more...

 

I have a lot of ebooks as well, but I acknowledge that as long as I'm reading on a screen I may be glossing over what I read without realising it.

 

I should add I don't have a Kindle.  Kindles might be as good as books for all I know, as the two studies don't rule them out, but the jury's still out and I've found them too annoying to use to want to keep buying them.

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On 10/7/2017 at 8:08 PM, 📚☕H🍎📚 said:

Will be on the reading pile when I get around to Marx, which will be after I get around to Hegel

 

:)

 

On 10/8/2017 at 9:34 AM, BEAST said:

ebooks :lol: anyone who bothers with them deserves to be fired into the sun. 

 

I don't have any more space in my house for physical books, so I've bought ebooks pretty much exclusively for the past few years. As others said, the paperwhite is a nice reading experience. Much better than reading off a backlit phone/computer screen, and it lets me have a book addiction without filling every available surface in my home.

 

The only drawback imo is the ADD factor that creeps in with all digital media, it's a bit too easy to bail on one thing and start another. And you don't get the same satisfaction from seeing the "time left in book" number creep down as you do from seeing your progress through a physical book.

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43 minutes ago, 📚☕H🍎📚 said:

I used to think this, but through experience and studies about e-reading (such as this and this), I've become won over more to the "physical books" camp.  (I do not hold the same convictions about "physical" music and movies)  The short of it is that, at least on present evidence, people tend to gloss more and retain less of what they read on a screen.  The reasons for this are not yet fully understood, but at any rate, if I want to retain more...

 

I have a lot of ebooks as well, but I acknowledge that as long as I'm reading on a screen I may be glossing over what I read without realising it.

 

I should add I don't have a Kindle.  Kindles might be as good as books for all I know, as the two studies don't rule them out, but the jury's still out and I've found them too annoying to use to want to keep buying them.

 

The ploblem here is that you're thinking of a traditional 'screen' instead of a Kindle, so please don't quote me with this bollocks. Thanks x

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Image result for new york 2140

 

Still my most recent purchase, still haven't finished reading it. Been a very busy few months for me.

 

Image result for insane clown president

 

 

This was good, and a quick read. Taibbi saw a lot of what was driving the campaign that other journalists missed, even though the furthest he went prior to the election was "Trump surely can't win, but if he did I wouldn't be that shocked."

 

Image result for scum manifesto

 

:hecks:

 

Image result for there is no year

 

Can't remember where I saw this one recommended. I started it one afternoon in the waiting room at my mechanic's shop, think I'll come back and finish it once I'm done this last 30% of NY 2140

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13 minutes ago, Minori said:

 

The ploblem here is that you're thinking of a traditional 'screen' instead of a Kindle, so please don't quote me with this bollocks. Thanks x

Like I’ve said, the jury’s still out.  The second of the papers I cited provides several explanations, including that the very sight of the text in its entirety and the feeling of the pages on our hands has a role in how well we can retain what we read.  If that’s true, a different screen won’t fix retention issues by itself.

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A few things that I've bought/borrowed in the last few months

 

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A science fiction novel set in China partly in the current era, partly during the Cultural Revolution. I enjoyed it even if some of the passages in the VR game droned on a bit much. It has some interesting ideas on where things are going with human civilization. 

 

49563.jpg

 

In the middle of this now. I've only read Metamorphosis before. So far I'm intrigued. About halfway through.

 

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Haven't started this yet. I've heard good things though.

 

51x5Me0w7zL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I've started it. It's pretty long (over 600 pages). But a very interesting  look at Exon Mobil and how they sway American foreign policy. Especially during the Bush years.

 

514+cq0c8gL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

A pretty enlighten look at the evolution of Putin as a political figure. Finished it a few month ago but I highly recommend it.  

 

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59 minutes ago, 📚☕H🍎📚 said:

Like I’ve said, the jury’s still out.  The second of the papers I cited provides several explanations, including that the very sight of the text in its entirety and the feeling of the pages on our hands has a role in how well we can retain what we read.  If that’s true, a different screen won’t fix retention issues by itself.

 

Approaching literature in terms of 'retention' seems absolutely mental. This is like talking to a robot.

 

Do you understand the difference between studying for a test and reading fiction for enjoyment?

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25 minutes ago, Grim Peaks🌲🌲 said:

 

 

Haven't started this yet. I've heard good things though.

 

 

Be careful with that one, I've read and heard some scathing critiques. It seems to be the sort of "the problem is cultural" arguments racists make about inner city black people, but applied to Appalachia. 

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18 hours ago, Minori said:

 

Approaching literature in terms of 'retention' seems absolutely mental. This is like talking to a robot.

 

Do you understand the difference between studying for a test and reading fiction for enjoyment?

Like I've said, most of what I read isn't fiction.  Most of the time when I read fiction it's just for a few minutes at night to help me sleep, and I go through it very slowly, retention isn't so much a priority then.

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21 hours ago, Endless Capitalism 💰💵 said:

 

Be careful with that one, I've read and heard some scathing critiques. It seems to be the sort of "the problem is cultural" arguments racists make about inner city black people, but applied to Appalachia. 

 

Yeah, I've read some interviews with JD Vance and that does seem to be his angle. Definitely seems to be a pretty conservative argument. So I'm skeptical of that going in. 

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21 hours ago, Minori said:

 

Approaching literature in terms of 'retention' seems absolutely mental. This is like talking to a robot.

 

Do you understand the difference between studying for a test and reading fiction for enjoyment?

 

Retention just means remembering what you read :| whats weird about wanting that

 

Also FUCK that Hillbilly Elegy shit. I dont have the patience or energy to explain why its trash, so just take this as proof:

Quote

The book was also positively received by conservatives such as New York Times op-ed columnist Ross Douthat,[9] National Review columnist Mona Charen[10] and National Review editor and Slate columnist Reihan Salam.[11]

 

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40 minutes ago, Bill, the vampire from True Blood said:

 

Also FUCK that Hillbilly Elegy shit. I dont have the patience or energy to explain why its trash, so just take this as proof:

 

 

There was a chapo episode about this book that had a characteristically good Matt Christman rant in it:

 

"I hate the guys who want to make crocodile tears at these lost communities and then try to make half-hearted attempts to contextualize their pain, but at the end of the day say "hey uhhhh, what's gonna happen to them is gonna happen to them", because we've enshrined capital as the protagonist of civilization and actual human lives are just grist in this blood mill to get spit out and do whatever capital decides to do with them. If you believe that capital is the protagonist of history you shouldn't give a shit about any of these people, and you should say "if you're too fucking stupid to make it work, you should get destroyed". As Alan Greenspan said about Atlas Shrugged, "those who lack dignity or purpose perish as they should" and I have a lot more respect for that than for people who want to pretend they give a shit about humans while putting their all behind economic trends that just destroy people."

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I don't really discriminate against any one format, which is somewhat similar to how i approach music, though of course it's very different, not least because music has so many varied physical formats whereas with books i'm really talking about methods of acquisition in a way. i used to be down on both ebooks and audiobooks as a personal choice but i've recognized their usefulness. my reading is definitely not evenly divided between formats and i go through periods where i'll say listen to a bunch of ebooks but also be reading a physical book or whatever, and sometimes i buy physical books new or used, whereas sometimes i check them out from the library. they all have their charms for me but it's totally on a case by case basis

 

there are so many books i've bought and not read yet but when i own a book it usually means someday i'll get around to it

i started tracking the books i read in 2014 and i kind of want to go through and label what form of reading/acquisition i used for each

 



finished in 2014

poor relations by balzac - ebook on phone from project gutenberg

the red and the black by stendhal - bought paperback just before reading

childhood's end by arthur c clarke - trade paperback given to me by a friend's mother, put in a little free library after reading

a clockwork orange by burgess - paperback loaned by a friend

finished in 2015

a storm of swords by grrm - bought paperback many years ago, this was a reread

morphine by bulgakov - bought paperback a few months before reading

wolf in white van by darnielle - bought hardcover

growing up cuban in decatur, georgia, by carmen agra deedy - audiobook checked out from library on cd, read by local author

lost in a good book by jasper fforde - not sure if i bought this actually

sense and sensibility by austen - loaned by my mom

persuasion by austen - loaned by my mom

flowers for algernon by keyes - paperback checked out from library

treasure island by stevenson - my first experience with synced up audiobook/ebook on kindle 

dracula by stoker - another audiobook/ebook combo

the first bad man by miranda july - bought hardcover

animal farm by orwell - checked out deluxe hardcover from library

cocaine blues by kerry greenwood - checked out of library

memories of the future - finally finishing paperback i bought years ago and started at the time

finished in 2016

stranger in a strange land by heinlein - bought paperback

the martian by weir - loaned by my boss

a feast for crows by grrm - not honestly sure how i read this, maybe i bought it???? fuck

hercule poirot's christmas by agatha christie - audiobook from audible

musicophilia by oliver sacks - audiobook on cd checked out of library

the girl with the golden eyes by balzac - checked out of library

one flew over the cuckoo's nest by kesey - paperback i'd owned for years

the life we bury by eskens - audible

five little pigs by christie - audible

the end of the world news by burgess - paperback i'd owned for years

the world is round by stein - reread of tiny book i was given as a child

child of god by mccarthy - checked out of library

airframe by chrichton - paperback i'd owned for years

utz by chatwin - paperback i'd owned for years

peril at end house by christie - audible

eleanor and park by rainbow rowell - audible

timequake by vonnegut - checked out of library

the handmaid's tale by atwood - audible

tinder by gardner - bought on amazon

very far away from anything else by le guin - checked out of library

finished in 2017

wuthering heights by bronte - kindle ebook

the created legend by sologub - kindle ebook

play it as it lays by didion - checked out of library

picnic at hanging rock by lindsay - kindle ebook

breakfast of champions - paperback i'd owned for a while

towards zero by christie - audible

ordeal by innocence by christie - audible

still life by louise penny - audible

a book of common prayer by didion - checked out of library

currently in the process of reading the a dance with dragons enhanced ebook on my iphone, also sporadically listening to an audiobook, and have an ebook started on my kindle that i'm gonna get back to later. there are plenty of physical books i've started that i may or may not pick up again soon

 

i find audible nice when the narration is well done, especially because i can listen while doing things, and the synced up audiobook/ebook especially nice when the ebook is in the public domain and is something i feel like i should have read but might find a slog otherwise. being able to go from just reading to just listening to sometimes reading along with the narrator gets me through something like dracula faster bc i don't have to put it down during my driving commute but i can also read it without sound when that is convenient

 

i like ebooks for the instantaneous acquisition like i watched the movie picnic at hanging rock and was ilke i have to read that and instantly had the ebook even tho it wasn't in any library near me 

 

but as you can see i still love physical books not just for how it feels to read them but also for the ability to browse the shelves of a library or loan or give something to someone you think would enjoy it 

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On 10/9/2017 at 1:12 PM, Grim Peaks🌲🌲 said:

 

49563.jpg

 

 

i still have the german and russian novels i bought for classes in college, of which this is a favorite. however, i'm looking forward to reading more kafka because while i thought this was very good and made me fall in love with kafka where i hadn't with the metamorphosis, i still think i will actually prefer other novels of his. 

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On 10/9/2017 at 12:26 PM, Minori said:

 

The ploblem here is that you're thinking of a traditional 'screen' instead of a Kindle, so please don't quote me with this bollocks. Thanks x

 

says the person who works from Amazon?

 

it's a fucking screen.  traditional, non-traditional, Kindle-traditional.  it's a fucking screen.

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On 10/10/2017 at 3:38 AM, Comrade Skeltal said:

 

Be careful with that one, I've read and heard some scathing critiques. It seems to be the sort of "the problem is cultural" arguments racists make about inner city black people, but applied to Appalachia. 

 

I read this not knowing much about it and the first half was a pretty sad memoir about growing up in poverty and then he joins the military and goes to law school and somehow concludes that everyone should just do what he did.

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On 08/10/2017 at 1:08 AM, 📚☕H🍎📚 said:

I'm making this thread because in the past year I have been convinced of the value of physical books, as opposed to ebooks.  Since then my bookshelves have multiplied in size.  However, I mostly buy nonfiction and especially philosophy.

 

Last week at a book fair I bought these books:

 

51wLG+bC06L._SX308_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Friedrich Nietzsche—Beyond Good and Evil (trans. Marion Faber)

 

My first experience reading Nietzsche, for my reading group.  So far I've read Book I and Book II and find him to be surprisingly difficult, I say difficult because his writing is not systematic and I have to look at the margins and the context of his other work to know the positive content of his philosophy, I say that's surprising because he has a reputation of being an engaging writer even in many translations.  He is indeed engaging but it's easy to see how laymen misread him.

 

51UxwLMqTEL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Noam Chomsky—Problems of Knowledge and Freedom

 

I don't know much about this but I bought it for its uniqueness: this is a written presentation of lectures Chomsky gave on the legacy of Bertrand Russell in 1971 (both his philosophy and politics), one year after Russell's death.  Being well-acquainted with both Russell's philosophy and radical politics I'm curious to see Chomsky's take.  So far I've only read Chomsky's introduction.

 

41C5B4b-pGL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Thomas Kuhn—The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

 

I'm starting to come at this from debates about realism and relativism in metaphysics, having first engaged with Donald Davidson's criticisms in "On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme".

 

662867.jpg

 

Michel de Montaigne—The Complete Works (trans. Donald M. Frame)

 

I know little about Montaigne other than that he was a significant influence on Francis Bacon, and this was a hardback in perfect condition.  It's probably going to be on my shelf for a while.


Earlier today I bought these:

 

9780744800142-uk-300.jpg

Erich Fromm—The Fear of Freedom

 

Also known as Escape from Freedom.  Fromm, a critical theorist of the Frankfurt School, successfully managed to escape Nazi tyranny in the early 1930s.  This book, published in 1941, is apparently a speculative examination of the psychological and sociological conditions from which Nazism grew and took shape.  Maybe it will help me understand our current predicament.

 

220px-Contingency-Irony-and-Solidarity.j

Richard Rorty—Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity

 

The work which marked Rorty's final break from analytic philosophy in a sense, after his attack on foundationalist epistemologies in the preceding Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature and his move from Princeton to the University of Virginia.  This book includes a serious discussion of Jacques Derrida, he and Graham Priest being basically the only big names I know in analytic philosophy who have done this.  More stuff to read for background on contemporary-ish writing on realism and relativism.

 

25242._UY475_SS475_.jpg

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel—Reason in History (trans. Robert S. Hartman)

 

I plan to start trying to read Hegel soon.  Instead of diving right into The Phenomenology of Spirit I'm thinking of starting with primary and secondary readings of his logic, his writing on Fichte and Schelling, and this little book composed from his lectures on the philosophy of history.

 

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David McLellan—Marx and Religion

 

Will be on the reading pile when I get around to Marx, which will be after I get around to Hegel.

 

41SU5lK0uoL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

G. A. Cohen—Finding Oneself in the Other

 

A collection of mostly philosophical essays from the quintessential "analytical Marxist" who is notoriously hostile to dialectical method.  When I get around to Marxist political philosophy I'll read some of this concurrently with his continental adversaries.

Pretentious cunt

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