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What Books Have You Bought?

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On 11/10/2017 at 5:28 AM, Lauren Tsai said:

murakami-blog.jpg

 

too many squares. makes his books look more diverse than they are

 

i love the guy though, and I respect he and Kundera for working the same themes over and over again, like there's something that they want to say and think that they haven't done it yet to their satisfaction

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I got these in the last couple days:

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Not sure which one I'll get to first. I've been on a non-fiction kick, but I love Shostakovich and have wanted to read Julian Barnes forever. Right now I'm reading

 

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which I got last week and am loving it. The author described one of the protagonists as looking like Bowie in the Man Who Fell to Earth, and another as looking like another actor, and I hate that, but the characterization and story are both very good. It's not brilliant literature but it's an excellent crime novel (1/3 of the way through) and I love good crime. Speaking of good crime, Ellroy has to get cracking on that second LA Quartet before he dies! Perfidia was three years ago! That's not long at all for him, but he's old now and he's got three more to write!

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Got this this morning: Knowledge, Class, and Economics: Marxism without Guarantees 

 

Was like $20 cheaper as a Kindle edition on Amazon so I picked that up.

 

Quote

 

Knowledge, Class, and Economics: Marxism without Guaranteessurveys the "Amherst School" of non-determinist Marxist political economy, 40 years on: its core concepts, intellectual origins, diverse pathways, and enduring tensions. The volume’s 30 original essays reflect the range of perspectives and projects that comprise the Amherst School—the interdisciplinary community of scholars that has enriched and extended, while never ceasing to interrogate and recast, the anti-economistic Marxism first formulated in the mid-1970s by Stephen Resnick, Richard Wolff, and their economics Ph.D. students at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

 

The title captures the defining ideas of the Amherst School: an open-system framework that presupposes the complexity and contingency of social-historical events and the parallel "overdetermination" of the relationship between subjects and objects of inquiry, along with a novel conception of class as a process of performing, appropriating, and distributing surplus labor. In a collection of 30 original essays, chapters confront readers with the core concepts of overdetermination and class in the context of economic theory, postcolonial theory, cultural studies, continental philosophy, economic geography, economic anthropology, psychoanalysis, and literary theory/studies.

 

Though Resnick and Wolff’s writings serve as a focal point for this collection, their works are ultimately decentered—contested, historicized, reformulated. The topics explored will be of interest to proponents and critics of the post-structuralist/postmodern turn in Marxian theory and to students of economics as social theory across the disciplines (economics, geography, postcolonial studies, cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, political theory, philosophy, and literary studies, among others).

 

 

 

Was interested by an interview with one of the authors/editors, on Richard Wolff's podcast.

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On 1/19/2018 at 8:43 AM, eeeezypeezy said:

 

Getting a ton out of this, very glad I spent the money. So far the essays have been very readable, I was worried about it being overly dry and academic. Likely this is down to my affinity for the subject matter, though.

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Red Mars :wub:

 

I got a conservative dude at work interested in reading that series, curious to see what he makes of it. Anticipating the usual "it's great until he talks politics" take that misses the whole point.

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Yeah, they're great. It's basically one long novel divided into books by major events in the plot.

 

A lot of people have trouble with the long passages describing the environment of Mars, so you may have to force yourself through them at first, but I found the overall effect really stunning. By the time you finish the series you feel like you've been there. The "Mars had been a power; now it became a place" bit from the introduction to the first book describes the phenomenon nicely.

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16 minutes ago, I am a damn ass bunny said:

damn dude when do you find the time to read all of these

 

I usually read about an hour to an hour and a half before bedtime to help me relax, but january is the time of year i start to burn out on games and tv and just read way more than i usually do. So this is the time I start buying books.

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