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2 hours ago, ocean said:

aw damn @dregs how do u feel about Anglican services 

I grew up Episcopal and the liturgical style was like the best part about it

I prefer the less-Catholic version of it, though, less dogma more love and acceptance 

 

probably one of my biggest regrets from my time in england is not attending an anglican service.  wasn't devout enough at the time i s'pose.

 

2 hours ago, I am a damn ass bunny said:

have any of the board christians read or heard about this new testament translation? https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/01/the-new-testament-a-translation-david-bentley-hart/546551/ honestly sounds p interesting

 

sounds cool & bonkers and maybe a little bit heretical

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4 hours ago, dregs said:

 

probably one of my biggest regrets from my time in england is not attending an anglican service.  wasn't devout enough at the time i s'pose.

 

have you been to one in canada tho? i've only been to episcopal churches in the us, i guess most international churches in the anglican communion have "spun off" and in many cases developed their own book of common prayer 

 

Quote
 

The Episcopal Church separated itself from the Church of England in 1789, the first church in the USA having been founded in 1607.(Cross & Livingstone 1975) Its prayer book, published in 1790, had as its sources the 1662 English book and the 1764 Scottish Liturgy (see above) which Bishop Seabury of Connecticut had brought over following his consecration in Aberdeen in 1784, containing elements of each (Perry 1922). The preface to the 1789 Book of Common Prayer says, "this Church is far from intending to depart from the Church of England in any essential point of doctrine, discipline, or worship...further than local circumstances require." There were some notable differences. For example, in the Communion service the prayer of consecration follows mainly the Scottish orders derived from 1549 (Shepherd 1965, 82) and found in the 1764 Book of Common Prayer. The compilers used materials derived from ancient liturgies especially Eastern Orthodox ones such as the Liturgy of St. James.(Shepherd 1965, 82) An epiclesis was included, as in the Scottish book, though modified to meet reformist objections. Overall, the book was modelled on the English Prayer Book, the Convention having resisted attempts at deletion and revision.(McGarvey & Gibson 1907) The 1789 American BCP reintroduced explicit sacrificial language in the Prayer of Consecration by adding the words "which we now offer unto Thee", after "with these thy holy gifts" from the 1549 BCP. The insertion undid Cranmer's rejection of the Eucharist as a material sacrifice by which the Church offers itself to God in an unbloody liturgical representation in and with the very same sacrifice of Christ who is both priest and victim, both offering and offered. This reworking thereby aligned the church's eucharistic theology more closely to that of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches.

Further revisions occurred in 1892 and 1928, in which minor changes were made, removing, for instance, some of Cranmer's Exhortations and introducing such innovations as prayers for the dead.

In 1979, a more substantial revision was made. There were now two rites for the most common services, the first that kept most of the language of 1928, and the second using only contemporary language (some of it newly composed, and some adapted from the older language). Many changes were made in the rubrics and the shapes of the services, which were generally made for both the traditional and contemporary language versions. However, there was arguably a greater degree of continuity than was the case in England, which may account for the fact that all the books of the series, from 1790 to 1979 retain the same title. The 1979 book owes a good deal to the Liturgical Movement and to the 19th-century Catholic revival. Many traditionalists, both Anglo-Catholics and Evangelicals, felt alienated by the theological changes made in the 1979 BCP, and in 1991 The Church of the Good Shepherd in Rosemont, PA published a book entitled, the Anglican Service Book which is "a traditional language adaptation of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer together with the Psalter or Psalms of David and Additional Devotions." Books like this are allowed in the Episcopal Church because of a rubric in the 1979 Prayer Book which allows for the translation of the contemporary language into the traditional language of the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.

Even so, the revision caused some controversy and in 2000, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church issued an apology to those "offended or alienated during the time of liturgical transition to the 1979 Book of Common Prayer." Use of the 1928 Book of Common Prayer is currently discouraged. Article X of the Canons of the Episcopal Church provides that "[t]he Book of Common Prayer, as now established or hereafter amended by the authority of this Church, shall be in use in all the Dioceses of this Church," which, of course, is a reference to the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.[c]

 

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Another aunt found a vhs movie that was rated R in her daughter’s room. She burned it and said she heard high pitched screaming coming from it as it burned. She’s not keen on physics.

 

Also, my friends mom in 7th grade found his Magic cards and burned them one by one on the stove eye as he watched.

 

I dont know why they burn it. If I were a god fearing man I think I’d bury it so the demon doesnt escape.

 

Forever trapped in a Little Tikes slide

 

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Yeah it can be very hard to be yourself around those kinds of people. I lucked out and was raised Catholic. I never took it seriously and stopped believing when I was nine.

 

I was just surrounded by Pentecostals growing up. I went to a a few sermons as a kid. It was the scariest shit ever and shook the faith right out of me.

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36 minutes ago, ant man bee said:

I think I’ve told this story before, but I once rode my bike to my cousins’ house to find a smoldering pile of melted children’s toys. My Pentecostal aunt and uncle thought the toys were possessed by demons.

 

I remember when my grandparents moved to the south they had a neighbor who refused to use their bathroom because she swore there were demons in the shower curtain.

 

My grandma likes owls for whatever reason and the shower curtain had a cute owl on it.

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Last year one of my friends called me because he had a falling out with his mom. She was pressuring him to break up with his girlfriend of many years and things got heated and it somehow led to him telling her he didn’t believe in god and she started crying. She said that she felt sad because her child was going to hell.

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my parish had this annual fall festival that lasted a whole weekend and it would be a bunch of fair games and food and stuff on the church/gymnasium grounds.

 

and also gambling. lots of gambling! my pals and I would waste tons of money on this big spinny wheel they had, I guess it was just a dumbed down version of roulette, for the kids.

 

literal children gambling in the house of god. it was our biggest fundraiser every year! 

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15 minutes ago, c.i. said:

my parish had this annual fall festival that lasted a whole weekend and it would be a bunch of fair games and food and stuff on the church/gymnasium grounds.

 

and also gambling. lots of gambling! my pals and I would waste tons of money on this big spinny wheel they had, I guess it was just a dumbed down version of roulette, for the kids.

 

literal children gambling in the house of god. it was our biggest fundraiser every year! 

 

:lol:

 

 Catholicsm is like religious insurance. Its become such a fucking joke denomination. It’s only there just in case there’s a god.

 

My old church’s annual fund raising thing is a seafood food festival where gumbo is the popular dish. All the dads would sneak in beer.

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I've heard Catholicism referred to as a "cafeteria religion"; members walk down the proverbial line of tenets, choose the ones they like, and pass on the ones they don't. I suppose you could say that about many religions/denominations/sects to a degree, but it seems to be especially prevalent with Catholics (American ones, at least).

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1 minute ago, ant man bee said:

@pentachris have you ever come across people in Alabama that think Catholics worship Mary? That was one of the big things some people say in the more rural places here. I used to hear it all the time and still do occasionally.

Yeah, that's pretty common. Pretty sure I've got family members who believe that. I've got an aunt and uncle who, according to my mother, believe that my parents are going to hell because they are southern baptist instead of independent baptist. My mom can be a bit dramatic, and I've certainly never broached the subject with them, so that's probably a bit of an exaggeration. But there's no doubt in my mind that they believe Catholics aren't true Christians.

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on new years day my parents asked me more frankly than they have in a long time if i am interested in church/ever go or  would consider myself a christian :lol: i think i wiffle waffled a lot and then changed the subject, not proud, but i think i brought up how there are a lot of branches that i really don't like but that i thought the church i grew up in with them was one of the good ones, and even though i don't go to church i do actually go to these sacred harp singings which some would consider a form of church and often take place on sundays and/or in churches and involve singing songs a capella that have very religious texts but are not attached to any particular denomination. actually i think that's probably how i managed to change the subject is bc i sang for a few years in new england before moving back south and eventually starting to sing more here, and it's wayyyyy less christian up there. In New England there are a decent number of Jews who sing and people that in general aren't Christian but are drawn to the songs on other merits, and even though there are traditionally prayers at certain parts of the day, when they do it in Rhode Island for instance they "pray" in a more general way without going into God or Jesus specifics, but down south usually the prayers are actually your typical God and Jesus and Lord types of prayers, and you can just tell that there is a lot more of an assumption from believers that other people believe too. I do have some wacky older vegan friends who go to singings more than me and always urge me to go more, who are definitely not Christians, they are more into Ganesh actually

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I was asked if we worshipped Mary all the time as a kid and when I was in kindergarten my friends mom told him not to hang out with me because I worshipped Mary :lol: 

 

Albertville has a pretty sizeable Latin American population (actually had a This American Life made about Albertville’s unique immigration situation) here and many are catholic so it’s not such a big deal anymore now that the two cultures have been integrating more than ever.

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16 minutes ago, pentachris said:

I've heard Catholicism referred to as a "cafeteria religion"; members walk down the proverbial line of tenets, choose the ones they like, and pass on the ones they don't. I suppose you could say that about many religions/denominations/sects to a degree, but it seems to be especially prevalent with Catholics (American ones, at least).

haha the branch of Episcopalianism i grew up is basically that, and I always got the impression that Catholics were just simply too rigid about things :lol: i mean i guess it just comes from the whole pope thing where the OFFICIAL positions of things seem super weird and extreme even if most people don't follow them, whereas Episcopals are concerned with having a much more open and welcoming official position on things, established by committee, like this

Quote

In 1976, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church declared that “homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love, acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church" (1976-A069). Since then, faithful Episcopalians have been working toward a greater understanding and radical inclusion of all of God’s children.

Along the way, The Episcopal Church has garnered a lot of attention, but with the help of organizations such as Integrity USA, the church has continued its work toward full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Episcopalians. In 2003, the first openly gay bishop was consecrated; in 2009, General Convention resolved that God’s call is open to all; in 2012, a provisional rite of blessing for same-gender relationships was authorized, and discrimination against transgender persons in the ordination process was officially prohibited; and in 2015, the canons of the church were changed to make the rite of marriage available to all people, regardless of gender.

To our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender brothers and sisters: “The Episcopal Church welcomes you!”

12141590_10102411610350651_4735024359287 

:tear: 

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7 minutes ago, ant man bee said:

I was asked if we worshipped Mary all the time as a kid and when I was in kindergarten my friends mom told him not to hang out with me because I worshipped Mary :lol: 

 

Albertville has a pretty sizeable Latin American population (actually had a This American Life made about Albertville’s unique immigration situation) here and many are catholic so it’s not such a big deal anymore now that the two cultures have been integrating more than ever.

oh jeez that's insane

 

i remember the really weird thing about being Catholic was that there was one day per year when you were literally marked out for the rest of school to see who you were, on Ash Wednesday

like, I actually did go to Ash Wednesday services and get marked with an ash cross on my forehead but since I had the option to do it in the evening I did, whereas all the Catholic kids would like go to a noon service and come back with the ashes on their forehead. That was the main reason I knew anyone at all was Catholic, although actually those things they wore around their necks weren't always as noticeable but if they had one then you knew. 

 

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I was raised in baptist churches. In high school, I started going to the episcopal church where my best friend's dad was the rector. I think the perfect church for me would be an episcopal congregation and traditional episcopal service, but with a baptist hymnal.

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I was raised in baptist churches. In high school, I started going to the episcopal church where my best friend's dad was the rector. I think the perfect church for me would be an episcopal congregation and traditional episcopal service, but with a baptist hymnal.

 

i love the episcopal hymnal tho :')

tho tbf i think some of the best shit is in the service music section 

like i was genuinely sad when one of my favorite ones stopped being used at our church 

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7 minutes ago, dhsb said:

old testament update: jacob/israel absolutely screwing over his brother :lol: that little punk

lowkey probably one of the most wtf moments of my childhood was realizing that's what happened, probably helped plant the seeds of nonbelief or at least belief that even if there is a god why does he condone such a dick move!

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I was never religious myself, nor was anyone in my immediate family really 

 

My grandmother is devout but also very liberal and absolutely does not preach outside of church and my grandfather was an Episcopalian minister but drinks, swears, and tells gross jokes so hes hardly a paragon

 

Weirdly, my mother has recently turned into the kind of aggressive atheist you generally only see in neckbeard stereotypes

 

 

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my grandfather (rip) was extremely religious at least in later life idk, apparently was very active in gideons, and did at one time give me a gideons bible to take to college or something, but wasn't actually all that pushy. it's the kind of thing you don't necessarily realize the extent of until the funeral, as other members of my family told stories, who experienced more of that side.

 

this was my dad's dad and both his parents were methodist, and my dad was like idk saved or something in high school and briefly went to seminary to become a minister but then dropped out, idk my mom and her parents were both episcopalian and idk whether my dad switched denominations before or after meeting her, but somehow his sister also ended up episcopalian, possibly also due to her ex-husband 

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I think neckbeardy atheism comes from resentment of being controlled and judged by religious types. At least I think that's where mine stemmed from. Even though my immediate family wasn't religious, there's a lot of ambient religious judgment in this country, so being a closeted gay kid my self-loathing turned into resentment before it turned into understanding and acceptance.

c.i. and I am a damn ass bunny like this

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