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Your Favo(u)rite Novels - TELL ME WHAT THEY ARE

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Well I'm p ashamed to admit that I haven't read a lot of fiction in the last two years or so. Being a political science major in all, most of the books I read are non-fiction/social science/history related.

 

I've been meaning to rectafy that though.

 

Really like anything by Fitzgerald. He has such a way of making anything interesting. Murakami is possibly my favorite author though.

 

Lolita is also a hell of a book even though it's kinda a slog to get through. Nabokov is probably the only Russian author who has also written a great American novel.

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et tu, babe? - mark leyner

invisible cities - italo calvino

a confederacy of dunces - john kennedy toole

catch 22 - joseph heller

neuromancer - william gibson

cat's cradle - kurt vonnegut

farewell, my lovely - raymond chandler

the master and margarita - mikhail bulgakov

good omens - neil gaiman & terry pratchett

maximum bob - elmore leonard

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Now we're cooking. :thumbsup:

 

I could not stand Crime and Punishment (outside of the first 70 pages) but I tend to not be too keen on many old (pre 20th century) novels.

 

 

Some great ones there, burger, plus a few I've been meaning to check out (and some new ones which I guess was the purpose of the thread).

 

I like Murakami a lot too.

 

e: zuval, never been able to get into Hemingway. Plus he seems like a dick. Should try again, though.

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Nice, I'm looking forward to reading it! re: We

 

 

et tu, babe? - mark leyner
invisible cities - italo calvino
the master and margarita - mikhail bulgakov
maximum bob - elmore leonard

 

Gotta check these out. I love If On a Winter's Night except for that it got progressively a bit too clever. Like Catch 22 a lot and Confederacy is amazing.

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I could not stand Crime and Punishment (outside of the first 70 pages) but I tend to not be too keen on many old (pre 20th century) novels.

classic moose only in it for the axe murder all crime no punishment  :D

 

 

Grapes of Wrath & Catch-22 are probably my favorite novels. I prefer Catch-22 more, but Steinbeck has been my favorite author for a long time now

Steinbeck is phenomenal, he's probably the best at writing about a setting and making me feel like I'm right there in California or wherever. Him and Dostoevsky are probably my favorites.

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My favorite novel is The World According to Garp, by John Irving. I love every sentence, I've read it through five or six times at this point.

 

Beyond that I have favorite writers more than I have specific favorite novels.  Vonnegut, I've read all but a few of his...Hunter Thompson, I've got just about everything he ever committed to paper.  Kim Stanley Robinson is a relatively new discovery, the Mars Trilogy in particular is fantastic but I loved Shaman and 2312 as well.

 

As far as more traditionally-literary things go I love Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. I loved Madame Bovary oddly enough. Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg are my big gay poets with big smelly beards.  I could go on.

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Find Hunter Thompson to be a bit rambling, never finished anything of his.

 

His political essays are where it's at, I love the novels but his shorter pieces are where he was at his best.  Have you ever read his obituary for Richard Nixon? :lol:

 

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/unbound/graffiti/crook.htm

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Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas has always been a favorite of mine. Read it 6 or 7 times. I know some people wouldn't consider this but Akira by Otomo, a 6000pg graphic novel is quite the achievement. The Dark Tower. There's more but I'm drawing a blank right now.

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I could not stand Crime and Punishment (outside of the first 70 pages) but I tend to not be too keen on many old (pre 20th century) novels.

classic moose only in it for the axe murder all crime no punishment  :D

 

I dunno, I really did like it most when he was planning the murder. His internal thoughts were more interesting, but then he got all mopey plus it turned all slapstick and ridiculous and people! couldn't stop! exclaiming!

 

Style at the time, onions in belts etc

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It's funny how divisive Hemmingway can be. People either seem to love him or hate him.

 

I think he's a pretty good author. Sun Also Rises was probably my favorite of his. I think I prefer his novels to his short stories though. I had to read The Snows of Kilimanjaro and it was the only story of his that I read that I didn't enjoy.

 

And yeah 'Norwegian Wood' was really great. One of my favorites for sure.

 

I know a lot of people think Murakami is pointless when he talks about food for 60 pages but I think it's pretty great. Especially because he makes something like that interesting.

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My favorite novel is The World According to Garp, by John Irving. I love every sentence, I've read it through five or six times at this point.

 

I really mean to get around to this too. I've only seen the movie but liked it. :w

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made a top 50 a while back, maybe it would change if i redid it but whatev

 

 

  1. Petersburg - Andrei Bely

  2. Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

  3. The Red and the Black - Stendhal

  4. Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky

  5. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass - Lewis Carroll

  6. The Tin Drum - Günter Grass

  7. The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoevsky

  8. The Master and Margarita - Mikhail Bulgakov

  9. Clockwork, or All Wound Up - Philip Pullman

  10. Sophie’s World: A Novel about the History of Philosophy - Jostein Gaarder

  11. The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoevsky

  12. The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

  13. Slaughterhouse Five - Kurt Vonnegut

  14. The Phantom Tollbooth - Norton Juster

  15. Austerlitz - W.G. Sebald

  16. Cat’s Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut

  17. We - Evgeny Zamyatin

  18. Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury

  19. The Petty Demon - Fyodor Sologub

  20. Villette - Charlotte Brontë

  21. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame

  22. The Seventh Cross - Anna Seghers

  23. The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner

  24. Matilda - Roald Dahl

  25. A Prayer for Owen Meany - John Irving

  26. And Then There Were None - Agatha Christie

  27. The Witches - Roald Dahl

  28. 1984 - George Orwell

  29. A Wrinkle in Time - Madeleine L’Engle

  30. Holes - Louis Sachar

  31. God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater - Kurt Vonnegut

  32. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen

  33. Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë

  34. Watership Down - Richard Adams

  35. The Trial - Franz Kafka

  36. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley

  37. Cousin Bette - Honore de Balzac

  38. Mother Night - Kurt Vonnegut

  39. The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald

  40. I Am a Cat - Soseki Natsume

  41. The Lost Princess: A Double Story - George MacDonald

  42. Seek - Paul Fleischman

  43. The Gambler - Fyodor Dostoevsky

  44. Dead Souls - Nikolai Gogol

  45. The Perks of Being a Wallflower - Stephen Chbosky

  46. The Crying of Lot 49 - Thomas Pynchon

  47. The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett

  48. Doctor Zhivago - Boris Pasternak

  49. A Separate Peace - John Knowles

  50. The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde

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A clockwork orange and the unbearable lightness of being

need to read these still 

 

Really like anything by Fitzgerald. He has such a way of making anything interesting. Murakami is possibly my favorite author though.

idk i really liked the great gatsby but i found this side of paradise somewhat boring. i mean i finished it in ebook which is saying something but i mostly just thought it was good not great. need to read murakami.

 

Nice, I'm looking forward to reading it! re: We

 

 

et tu, babe? - mark leyner

invisible cities - italo calvino

the master and margarita - mikhail bulgakov

maximum bob - elmore leonard

 

Gotta check these out. I love If On a Winter's Night except for that it got progressively a bit too clever. Like Catch 22 a lot and Confederacy is amazing.

yeah we & master/margarita are fantastic obv. i need to get more into non-russian lit, calvino and toole are also on my to-read list and both are books i associate with a specific person, who also happens to be a great proponent of the red and the black, so you should read that too!

 

My favorite novel is The World According to Garp, by John Irving. I love every sentence, I've read it through five or six times at this point.

 

Beyond that I have favorite writers more than I have specific favorite novels.  Vonnegut, I've read all but a few of his...Hunter Thompson, I've got just about everything he ever committed to paper.  Kim Stanley Robinson is a relatively new discovery, the Mars Trilogy in particular is fantastic but I loved Shaman and 2312 as well.

 

As far as more traditionally-literary things go I love Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. I loved Madame Bovary oddly enough. Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg are my big gay poets with big smelly beards.  I could go on.

loved a separate peace so i should really read garp. also never read hunter s thompson :( or madame bovary, or woolf. gahhhh 

 

i didn't like a portrait of the artist as a young man i didn't even quite finish it cuz i got bored but i still wonder if i would like his other stuff

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Cormac McCarthy -Blood Meridian

David Foster Wallace - Infinite Jest

Bret Easton Ellis - American Psycho

Cormac McCarthy - Suttree

Ken Kesey - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Mervyn Peake - The Gormenghast Novels

---

Roberto Bolano - 2666

Salinger - Catcher in the Rye

Murakami - The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

Jay McInerney - Bright Lights, Big City

Camus - The Stranger

William Gay - Provinces of Night

Joan Didion - Play It As It Lays

John Kennedy Toole - A Confederacy of Dunces

 

Absolute faves up the top. Bit hipster lit but fuck it. :pah:

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The Secret History - Donna Tartt

Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell

Ada or Ardor - Vladimir Nabokov

Destroy, She Said - Marguerite Duras

White Noise - Don DeLillo

A Gate at the Stairs - Lorrie Moore

The Crying of Lot 49 - Thomas Pynchon

Off the top of my head. I'm also a big fan of Murakami and Jonathan Lethem.

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Petersburg - Andrei Bely

 

Curious about this one, goodreads only has 3 ratings and no reviews.

 

 

fuck, russian spellings are annoying

this is the version i rated:

Petersburg

by Andrey BelyRobert A. Maguire (Translator)John E. Malmstad(Translator)
 
seriously incredible experience 
it's like music to my eyes 
i felt like it was an immersive experience reading it like if you don't get too bogged down in the plot and just kinda let it roll over you you get the idea. i've heard people say it's hard to read but i didn't find it so
 
 

 It was regarded by Vladimir Nabokov as one of the four greatest "masterpieces of twentieth century prose", after Ulysses and The Metamorphosis, and before In Search of Lost Time.[2][3]\
 
There are many similarities with Joyce's Ulysses: the linguistic rhythms and wordplay, the Symbolist and subtle political concerns which structure the themes of the novel, the setting of the action in a capital city that is itself a character, the use of humor. The differences are also notable: the English translation of Bely remains more accessible, his work is based on complex rhythm of patterns, and, according to scholarly opinion, does not use such a wide variety of innovations. But these innovations, which subvert commonplace literary rhetoric, are necessary to conveying Petersburg at such a tumultuous time.

 

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