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Police Brutality

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Even more hilarious/depressing is the over-militarization of the police force is essentially what the racist rednecks have always been terrified of but if Obama says anything watch how that magically changes

This is worth a look.  I think we're starting to see the effects of this change in ideology in a fairly large-scale, dramatic way.

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i def feel like there is a shift in tone irt the conversation on cops though - in the past if you said anything against the "idea of cops" etc people would jump down your throat (maybe it's because everyone i know has like at least one cop in the family or something idek) but it seems like a lot more people are more comfortable criticizing them, at least casually anyway. most articles i've read recently seem to be more focused on the militarization aspect, however the take away from almost all of them is that it's too late to fix, this has all happened under our noses and we should acceptedly learn to adapt around it

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let's just say that i think there are more cop lovers / boston strongers / general apathy at places like FU than f' the police hooliganism, iykwias - more of a socioeconomic comment really, 

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i def feel like there is a shift in tone irt the conversation on cops though - in the past if you said anything against the "idea of cops" etc people would jump down your throat (maybe it's because everyone i know has like at least one cop in the family or something idek)

Going in broad strokes, there was a rise in approval of the police force in the years immediately following 9/11.  There's been a bit of a drop since.  Neither were all that dramatic compared with, say, President Bush's approval ratings.

 

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most articles i've read recently seem to be more focused on the militarization aspect, however the take away from almost all of them is that it's too late to fix, this has all happened under our noses and we should acceptedly learn to adapt around it

Wait, where did you get this from?  On the one hand I don't know a huge amount about the intricacies of this militarisation process, I'm just reading about it now.  But there are proven ways to severely limit the authority of the police.

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i mean jon stewart's only real comment on the choke hold incident was a cute line about cops not seeing the camera phone, no public shaming etc just kind of passing it to larry wilmur (coming to 11:30!)

 

speaking of which this is some great info tbch: 

 

Rule #1: Know the Law (Wherever You Are)

 

Conceived at a time when pocket-sized recording devices were available only to James Bond types, most eavesdropping laws were originally intended to protect people against snoops, spies, and peeping Toms. Now with this technology in the hands of average citizens, police and prosecutors are abusing these outdated laws to punish citizens merely attempting to document on-duty police.

 

The law in 38 states plainly allows citizens to record police, as long as you don't physically interfere with their work. Police might still unfairly harass you, detain you, or confiscate your camera. They might even arrest you for some catchall misdemeanor such as obstruction of justice or disorderly conduct. But you will not be charged for illegally recording police.

 

Twelve states-California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Washington-require the consent of all parties for you to record a conversation.

 

However, all but 2 of these states-Massachusetts and Illinois-have an "expectation of privacy provision" to their all-party laws that courts have ruled does not apply to on-duty police (or anyone in public). In other words, it's technically legal in those 48 states to openly record on-duty police.

 

IMPORTANT UPDATES: As mentioned earlier, the First Circuit Court of Appeals covering Massachusetts declared the state's ban on recording police to be unconstitutional. In May, The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals covering Illinois also declared the state's harsh recording ban unconstitutional, ordering authorities to stop enforcing it. In November, The Supreme Court of the United States rejected Illinois' petition to appeal the Seventh Circuit Court's ruling.

 

 

 

Rule #2: Don't Secretly Record Police

 

In most states it's almost always illegal to record a conversation in which you're not a party and don't have consent to record. Massachusetts is the only state to uphold a conviction for recording on-duty police, but that conviction was for a secret recording where the defendant failed to inform police he was recording. (As in the Glik case, Massachusetts courts have ruled that openly recording police is legal, but secretly recording them isn't.)

 

Fortunately, judges and juries are soundly rejecting these laws. Illinois, the state with the most notorious anti-recording laws in the land, expressly forbids you from recording on-duty police. Early last month an Illinois judge declared that law unconstitutional, ruling in favor of Chris Drew, a Chicago artist charged with felony eavesdropping for secretly recording his own arrest. Last August a jury acquitted Tiawanda Moore of secretly recording two Chicago Police Internal Affairs investigators who encouraged her to drop a sexual harassment complaint against another officer. (A juror described the case to a reporter as "a waste of time.") In September, an Illinois state judge dropped felony charges against Michael Allison. After running afoul of local zoning ordinances, he faced up to 75 years in prison for secretly recording police and attempting to tape his own trial.

 

The lesson for you is this: If you want to limit your legal exposure and present a strong legal case, record police openly if possible. But if you videotape on-duty police from a distance, such an announcement might not be possible or appropriate unless police approach you.

 

 

Rule #3: Respond to "Shit Cops Say"

 

When it comes to police encounters, you don't get to choose whom you're dealing with. You might get Officer Friendly, or you might get Officer Psycho. You'll likely get officers between these extremes. But when you "watch the watchmen," you must be ready to think on your feet.

 

In most circumstances, officers will not immediately bull rush you for filming them. But if they aren't properly trained, they might feel like their authority is being challenged. And all too often police are simply ignorant of the law. Part of your task will be to convince them that you're not a threat while also standing your ground.

 

"What are you doing?"

Police aren't celebrities, so they're not always used to being photographed in public. So even if you're recording at a safe distance, they might approach and ask what you are doing. Avoid saying things like "I'm recording you to make sure you're doing your job right" or "I don't trust you."

Instead, say something like "Officer, I'm not interfering. I'm asserting my First Amendment rights. You're being documented and recorded offsite."

 

Saying this while remaining calm and cool will likely put police on their best behavior. They might follow up by asking, "Who do you work for?" You may, for example, tell them you're an independent filmmaker or a citizen journalist with a popular website/blog/YouTube show. Whatever you say, don't lie-but don't let police trick you into thinking that the First Amendment only applies to mainstream media journalists. It doesn't.

"Let me see your ID."

In the United States there's no law requiring you to carry a government ID. But in 24 states police may require you to identify yourself if they have reasonable suspicion that you're involved in criminal activity.

But how can you tell if an officer asking for ID has reasonable suspicion? Police need reasonable suspicion to detain you, so one way to tell if they have reasonable suspicion is to determine if you're free to go. You can do this by saying "Officer, are you detaining me, or am I free to go?"

If the officer says you're free to go or you're not being detained, it's your choice whether to stay or go. But if you're detained, you might say something like, "I'm not required to show you ID, but my name is [your full name]." It's up to you if you want to provide your address and date of birth if asked for it, but I'd stop short of giving them your Social Security number.

 

"Please stop recording me. It's against the law."

Rarely is it advisable to educate officers about the law. But in a tense recording situation where the law is clearly on your side, it might help your case to politely present your knowledge of state law.

 

For example, if an insecure cop tries to tell you that you're violating his civil liberties, you might respond by saying "Officer, with all due respect, state law only requires permission from one party in a conversation. I don't need your permission to record so long as I'm not interfering with your work."

 

If you live in one of the 12 all party record states, you might say something like "Officer, I'm familiar with the law, but the courts have ruled that it doesn't apply to recording on-duty police."

 

If protective service officers harass you while filming on federal property, you may remind them of a recently issued directive informing them that there's no prohibition against public photography at federal buildings.

"Stand back."

If you're approaching the scene of an investigation or an accident, police will likely order you to move back. Depending on the circumstances, you might become involved in an intense negotiation to determine the "appropriate" distance you need to stand back to avoid "interfering" with their work.

 

If you feel you're already standing at a reasonable distance, you may say something like, "Officer, I have a right to be here. I'm filming for documentation purposes and not interfering with your work." It's then up to you to decide how far back you're willing to stand to avoid arrest.

 

 

Rule #4: Don't Share Your Video with Police

 

If you capture video of police misconduct or brutality, but otherwise avoid being identified yourself, you can anonymously upload it to YouTube. This seems to be the safest legal option. For example, a Massachusetts woman who videotaped a cop beating a motorist with a flashlightposted the video to the Internet. Afterwards, one of the cops caught at the scene filed criminal wiretapping charges against her. (As usual, the charges against her were later dropped.)

 

On the other hand, an anonymous videographer uploaded footage of an NYPD officer body-slamming a man on a bicycle to YouTube. Although the videographer was never revealed, the video went viral. Consequently, the manufactured assault charges against the bicyclist were dropped, the officer was fired, and the bicyclist eventually sued the city and won a $65,000 settlement.

 

 

Rule #5: Prepare to be Arrested

 

Keene, New Hampshire resident Dave Ridley is the avatar of the new breed of journalist/activist/filmmaker testing the limits of the First Amendment right to record police. Over the past few years he's uploaded the most impressive collection of first-person police encounter videos I've ever seen.

Ridley's calm demeanor and knowledge of the law paid off last August after he was arrested for trespassing at an event featuring Vice President Joe Biden. The arresting officers at his trial claimed he refused to leave when ordered to do so. But the judge acquitted him when his confiscated video proved otherwise.

With respect to the law Ridley declares, "If you're rolling the camera, be very open and upfront about it. And look at it as a potential act of civil disobedience for which you could go to jail." It's indeed disturbing that citizens who are not breaking the law should prepare to be arrested, but in the current legal fog this is sage advice.

 

"Shut it off, or I'll arrest you."

At this point you are risking arrest in order to test the boundaries of free speech. So if police say they'll arrest you, believe them. You may comply by saying something like "Okay, Officer. But I'm turning the camera off under protest."

 

If you keep recording, brace yourself for arrest. Try your best not to drop your camera, but do not physically resist. As with any arrest, you have the right to remain silent until you speak with a lawyer. Use it.

Remember that the camera might still be recording. So keep calm and act like you're being judged by a jury of millions of your YouTube peers, because one day you might be.

 

 

Rule #6: Master Your Technology

 

Smartphone owners now outnumber users of more basic phones. At any moment there are more than 100 million Americans in reach of a device that can capture police misconduct and share it with the world in seconds.

 

If you're one of them, you should consider installing a streaming video recording and sharing app such as Bambuser. It's free to join and easy to use.

 

Always Passcode Protect Your Smartphone

The magic of Bambuser is that it can instantly store your video offsite. This is essential for preserving video in case police illegally destroy or confiscate your camera. But even with it installed, you'll want to make sure that your device is always passcode protected. If a cop snatches your camera, this will make it extremely difficult for her to simply delete your videos. (If a cop tries to trick you into revealing your passcode, never, never, never give it up!)

 

Keep in mind that Bambuser's offsite upload feature might be slow or nonexistent in places without Wi-Fi or a strong 3G/4G signal. Regardless, your captured video will be saved locally on your device until you've got a good enough signal to upload offsite.

Set Videos to "Private"

Both apps allow you to set your account to automatically upload videos as "private" (only you can see them) or "public" (everyone can see them). But until police are no longer free to raid the homes of citizens who capture and upload YouTube videos of them going berserk, it's probably wise to keep your default setting to "private."

 

With a little bit of practice you should be able to pull your smartphone from your pocket or purse, turn it on, enter your passcode, open the app, and hit record within 10 seconds. Keep your preferred app easily accessible on your home screen to save precious seconds. But don't try to shave milliseconds off your time by disabling your passcode.

 

Both apps share an important feature that allows your video to be saved if your phone is turned off-even if you're still recording. So if you anticipate that a cop is about to grab your phone, quickly turn it off. Without your passcode, police won't be able to delete your videos or personal information even if they confiscate or destroy your phone. If the phone is turned off while Bambuser records, the recording continues after the screen goes black.

 

This Bambuser "black out" feature is a double-edged sword. While it could easily trick cops into thinking you're not recording them, using it could push you into more dangerous legal territory. As previously mentioned, courts have shown a willingness to convict citizens for secretly recording police. So if you're somehow caught using this feature it might be easier for a prosecutor to convince a judge or jury that you've broken the law. It's up to you to decide if the increased legal risk is worth the potential to capture incriminating police footage.

 

 

Rule #7: Don't Point Your Camera Like a Gun

 

"When filming police you always want to avoid an aggressive posture," insists Holmes. To do this he keeps his strap-supported camera close to his body at waist level. This way he can hold a conversation while maintaining eye contact with police, quickly glancing at the viewfinder to make sure he's getting a good shot.

Obviously, those recording with a smartphone lack this angled viewfinder. But you can get a satisfactory shot while holding your device at waist level, tilting it upward a few degrees. This posture might feel awkward at first, but it's noticeably less confrontational than holding the camera between you and the officer's face.

Also try to be in control of your camera before an officer approaches. You want to avoid suddenly grasping for it. If a cop thinks you're reaching for a gun, you could get shot.

 

 

Becoming a Hero

If you've recently been arrested or charged with a crime after recording police, contact a lawyer with your state's ACLU chapter for advice as soon as possible. (Do not publicly upload your video before then.) You may also contact Flex Your Rights via Facebook or Twitter. We're not a law firm, but we'll do our best to help you.

If your case is strong, the ACLU might offer to take you on as a litigant. If you accept, your brave stand could forever change the way police treat citizens asserting their First Amendment right to record police. This path is not for fools, and it might disrupt your life. But next time you see police in action, don't forget that a powerful tool for truth and justice might literally be in your hands.

 

 

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it actually hurts how ridiculously otm these are:

 

http://www.theonion.com/articles/sometimes-unfortunate-things-happen-in-the-heat-of,36690/

 

 

Without any warning, an officer of the law can find himself in the mayhem of formal and de facto segregationist policies such as mortgage discrimination and redlining that made it impossible for people in the most dangerous neighborhoods to live anywhere else. One minute you’re pulling up beside a couple of teenagers walking down the street, and the next minute you’re face-to-face with racial disparity that dates back to the 17th century and undergirds our culture to this very moment.

 

http://www.theonion.com/articles/tips-for-being-an-unarmed-black-teen,36697/

 

too tough to choose just one so heres the whole article:

 

With riots raging in Ferguson, MO following the shooting death by police of an unarmed African-American youth, the nation has turned its eyes toward social injustice and the continuing crisis of race relations. Here are The Onion’s tips for being an unarmed black teen in America:

  • Shy away from dangerous, heavily policed areas.
  • Avoid swaggering or any other confident behavior that suggests you are not completely subjugated.
  • Be sure not to pick up any object that could be perceived by a police officer as a firearm, such as a cell phone, a food item, or nothing.
  • Explain in clear and logical terms that you do not enjoy being shot, and would prefer that it not happen.
  • Don’t let society stereotype you as a petty criminal. Remember that you can be seen as so much more, from an armed robbery suspect, to a rape suspect, to a murder suspect.
  • Try to see it from a police officer’s point of view: You may be unarmed, but you’re also black.
  • Avoid wearing clothing associated with the gang lifestyle, such as shirts and pants.
  • Revel in the fact that by simply existing, you exert a threatening presence over the nation’s police force.
  • Be as polite and straightforward as possible when police officers are kicking the shit out of you.
ocean and Boofie Brown like this

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Even more hilarious/depressing is the over-militarization of the police force is essentially what the racist rednecks have always been terrified of but if Obama says anything watch how that magically changes

This is worth a look. I think we're starting to see the effects of this change in ideology in a fairly large-scale, dramatic way.this is making my head hurt

and my heart

I mean I know this is happening and I've read about it before but every story I read just

I can't

:(

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We really do live in a police state

I post this not to wag dick, but I made a post about this on ateaseweb (hope linking to that site is ok) talking exactly about that because it's scaring me these days: http://board.ateaseweb.com//index.php?showtopic=235116580&pid=8619898&st=0&#entry8619898

The way police all over the US have conducted themselves, especially in the past year or so, is ridiculous. That being said, this Ferguson situation is other-worldly. It actually gives me chills. The conduct of the police during this entire situation is military-esque. Their own citizens being disallowed the freedom of peaceful protest by way of tear gas and flash bombs? Journalists being arrested without warrants or cause and not being allowed to film (which is absolutely their protected right)? Protecting their own rather than allowing transparency which would exist in any other fucking situation if it didn't involve a fellow officer breaking the law? This is an atrocity. This is supposed to be a country that prides itself on its freedoms, not North Korea. This is the definition of a "police state" on a small scale. It's terrifying to me. I don't even live in the US but might one day and this scares me. The discussion that police have become unnecessarily militarized is absolutely warranted. There are men with machine guns on the tops of swat vehicles that are slowly rolling toward non-violent protestors? Why?!

I seriously don't see a good outcome to this. Apparently police are revealing the officers name tomorrow, but I doubt that's even close to enough at this point. People will be seeking justice for the wrongs that have been committed since the shooting and likely won't even get the ear of a judge. So then what? How can the community ever trust their police force again?

kirembri likes this

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one of the new cops in my hometown is notoriously known in my family for carrying two thirties and a drunk girl through my backyard and into the woods after my parents came home and busted a party at our house when he was in high school, it was my sisters party

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masterful

 

ive known good cops and cops who frankly shouldnt be given any authority or responsibility whatsoever 

 

but ive always thought just the desire to be a cop makes someone a little off

 

i have a friend that's looking to become one, his father is one, which is funny b/c when we were in high school all he would talk about is how much he hates cops b/c his father is such a prick, i guess he doesn't know what else to do to make a career out of at this point

 

i'm assuming he'd be a good cop if he makes it in since he's always been a pretty good dude but idk

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i know one dude from ym high school who became a cop but i didnt "know" him you know?

 

also my dads grandfather was a cop and hes dead now

 

not saying theres a connection but nmaybe hthere is?

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i think cops are like any classification of people, in that there are good apples and bad apples - it's that old thing where if you have bad experience you tell more people than if you have a good experience. plus cops don't usually deal with good experiences, so there's that

 

tbch, the times i've interacted with the police have been trivial - traffic violations, busted parties in college - the most bullshit experience i've had with a cop was getting a ticket for having a beer in a brown bag on my way to see pavement in central park, but i guess i was asking for it. i feel like if anything most people have this kind of disdain for cops: seeing them as bureaucrats following quotas, rather than the "cops are pigs" narrative. the former is a pest, like anyone would complain about  an "asshole cop" who gave you a ticket  - but the latter seems to be example driven, and fizzles out as soon as the news cycle forgets about it. i guess that's what i saying earlier itt - like after rodney king the whole "cops are pigs" narrative was probably more on the collective social conscience than after 9/11 - where they were heroes etc. we love them when they do their job and fucking hate them when they abuse their power - and rightly so, but i don't think there is much consideration given to police operations within the general public. i certainly don't keep up with how they operate, and it always surprises me when i learn about all the fucked up shit that routinely occurs in every rank level in every region of the country. 

 

having said that the only time i could have been seriously fucked by the law, and by all considerations should have been arrested - the cop let me go, so i'm in no position to say that i've been personally affected by police harassment, which i'll readily admit is 100% socioeconomic, but i'm not gonna say that my criticism is based on personal experience bc for the most part cops have been fine to me. 

 

but the fact of the matter is that there is clear lack of oversight, training and accountability with cops nowadays. i think many people are genuinely shocked seeing that kind of artillery pop up so fast in a place like missouri. i mean, after the marathon bombings the BPD showed off a lot of their weapons and force, and it's not out of the line to think that boston has special equipment to use in special circumstances, but even that was a bit jarring to see, and that was in an active terrorist hunt in one of america's 10 largest metro areas (all debates on the city shutdown aside). seeing the same kind of equipment being used on such a smaller scale against a community that, at this point, has literally done NOTHING - has been truly shocking. 

 

like what exactly has happened? a kid got shot in the face five times after putting his hands up and screaming that he was unarmed, and the community has responded in protest. granted, they are being destructive in some areas, and there doesn't seem to be any organization behind the protest, which causes confusion for everyone - but what do they expect? they woke up finding a kid with his face shot off, rotting in the street for four hours. it's a shame when anything becomes violent or destructive, but the fact that the police have responded to their own negligence with such barbaric, brutal and strategically petty tactics shows major systematic problems within every facet of how the police operate. 

 

if they can't use the equipment effectively, who's selling it to them? who's paying for it? for what purpose does a north dakota town need a SWAT team and tanks?

 

if they aren't trained, who is responsible for training them? when was they last time they were trained to begin with?

 

where is the accountability? where was this guy's "partner"? who does he report to? the police response has been disastrous - how far up the management chain does this incompetence go? 

 

who are the personal? what do they actually do? 

 

like i guess it's just the way things are now - we all acknowledge that all the people we wouldn't want to be politicians are the only ones willing to run for public office, the only ones willing to be cops must have authoritative / violent tendencies - i'm not sure if that's something that will change anytime soon. if there's any hope, imo, it's that the internet presents an open platform where everyone is able to keep everyone else accountable, but net neutrality, so

 

:spongebob:

lukin?, c.i. and Boofie Brown like this

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michael brown is suspected in a convenience store robbery before his death so expect all the "see? this black unarmed man did deserve to be shot a bunch of times and left in the street to rot" comments

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michael brown is suspected in a convenience store robbery before his death so expect all the "see? this black unarmed man did deserve to be shot a bunch of times and left in the street to rot" comments

 

they will also probably find thc in his system at the time of his death - he was on HARD DRUGS and OUT OF CONTROL!!

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my friend wanted to become a cop in Ontario but she failed the interview stage :( when asked whether her husband ever did any illegal substances she was honest and said yes because he smokes weed every few days

she's the most straight edge person I know, she's got a university degree and is extremely physically fit so she'd make an amazing cop :( this makes me mad because good people like her can't get in but they allow a bunch of shitheads to roam the city and kill people (yes, this happens in Canada as well)

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